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The Franklin Post

Dariacore

Dariacore

Image depicting Daria’s room from the tv show “Daria.” Illustration by Alyson Sutherland.

Dariacore stands out as a true embodiment of anti-pop, surpassing artists like 100 gecs or Dorian Electra in their exploration of anti-pop/hyper-pop. While these artists create somewhat listenable music within their respective styles, Dariacore takes everything to the next level.

Dariacore was originally started by the musician Jane Remover. Dariacore wasn’t intended to be a genre but rather served as a musical outlet for Jane Remover’s alternate persona, “c0ncernn,” being named after Jane’s favorite TVshow “Daria.” Drawing heavy influence from various EDM subgenres such as dubstep, Jersey club, breakcore, and EDM lifestyle, Dariacore incorporates pop culture references, utilizing meme sounds and pop acapella from artists like Justin Bieber, Avril Lavigne, and even sampling Vanessa Carlton’s “A Thousand Miles” in c0ncernn’s track “copyright strike my fucking nuts.”

So, what sets Dariacore apart from other EDM genres? It’s undoubtedly one of the most absurd and borderline un-listenable drops. With its signature combination of heavy basses, extremely crunchy synths, and intentionally clipped mastering, Dariacore possesses an instantly recognizable sound. The snares used in Dariacore have also gained their reputation, as they take ordinary snares, shift them to achieve a metallic tone, and then subject them to extensive distortion.

But how does one go about creating a Dariacore song? The creative process behind this chaotic genre is a challenge in itself. Sampling vocals from diverse sources is critical, encouraging a light-hearted and humorous approach.

Regarding drums, Dariacore often embraces powerful kicks or ventures into unconventional tonal kick sounds. Snares frequently incorporate tonal layers, such as laser-like or metallic twangs, while Amen Breaks are common in intros.

Synths play a pivotal role in Dariacore, with saw waves being a popular choice. Serum (a versatile synth VST) is the most common choice for this. 

There’s plenty of room for experimentation with vocal samples or any other type of sample; it’s a space where your creativity can truly flourish. Often Dariacore artists use vocal samples to create melodies.

In Dariacore, the bass defies traditional expectations. It can take the form of any synth sound pitched down to a lower octave or be a heavily modified 808 bass, serving the purpose effectively. 

Fundamentally, the most crucial aspect is embracing a light-hearted and playful attitude. Avoid taking things too seriously and fully immerse yourself in the fun, quirkiness, and silliness of Dariacore. If you stumble upon a delightful melody, don’t hesitate to incorporate it. Let the genre’s essence guide your musical journey, and revel in the uniqueness that Dariacore has to offer.

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